Home Dental Radiology Malocclusion traits and oral health–related quality of life in children with osteogenesis imperfecta

Malocclusion traits and oral health–related quality of life in children with osteogenesis imperfecta

by adminjay


Footnotes

The Members of the Brittle Bone Disorders Consortium include Brendan Lee, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX; V. Reid Sutton, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX; Sandesh C. S. Nagamani, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX; Frank Rauch, Shriners Hospital for Children, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; Francis Glorieux, Shriners Hospital for Children, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; Jean-Marc Retrouvey, School of Dentistry, University of Missouri-Kansas City, MO; Paul Esposito, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE; Maegen Wallace, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE; Michael B. Bober, Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, Wilmington, DE; David Eyre, University of Washington, Seattle, WA; Danielle Gomez, Shriners Hospital for Children, Tampa, FL; Gerald Harris, Marquette University and Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI; Tracy Hart, Osteogenesis Imperfecta Foundation, Gaithersburg, MD; Mahim Jain, Kennedy Krieger Institute, Baltimore, MD; Deborah Krakow, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, CA; Jeffrey Krischer, College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL; Eric Orwoll, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR; Lindsey Nicol, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR; Cathleen Raggio, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY; Peter Smith, Shriner’s Hospitals for Children, Chicago, IL; Laura Tosi, Bone Health program, Children’s National Health System, Washington, DC.

Disclosure. None of the authors reported any disclosures.

This study was funded by grant 1U54AR068069-0 from the Brittle Bone Disease Consortium , which is a part of the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences Rare Diseases Clinical Research Network and is funded through the collaboration of the Office of Rare Diseases Research, National Center for Advancing, the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases , and the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research , and the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institutes of Child Health and Development . The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health. The Brittle Bone Desease Consortium is also supported by the Osteogenesis Imperfecta Foundation .

The authors are grateful to the patients and their families for participation in the study. The authors would also like to acknowledge the contributions of Dianne Nguyen, project manager for the Brittle Bone Disease Consortium and the following Brittle Bone Disease Consortium site coordinators: Melanie Abrahamson (Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR), Samantha Alon (University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA), Mahshid Azamian and Alicia Turner (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX), Cassondra Brown (Nemours Alfred I. duPont Hospital, Wilmington, DE), Erin Carter and Elizabeth Yonko (Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY), Angela Caudill (Shriners Hospital for Children, Chicago, IL), Kristy Dobose (Kennedy Krieger Institute, Baltimore, MD), Michaela Durigova (Shriners Hospital for Children, Montreal, Quebec, Canada), Austin Giles and Elmer Rajah (Children’s National Medical Center), Margaret Gross-King (Shriners Hospital for Children, Tampa, FL), and Elizabeth Strudthoff (University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE).



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